Friday Finds (12) – 19 December 2014

Image1Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

Sooooooo, I suck at getting my posts done on time, especially when I have a list of them that I’m excited about (4 at the moment) so once again I’ll just be posting each book’s synopsis as it’s written on Goodreads, rather than putting it into my own words like usual. Hopefully I’ll be more productive and organised in the New Year!

Here are my finds for this week:

1) The World’s Strongest Librarian: A Memoir of Tourette’s, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family by Josh Hanagarne: Josh Hanagarne couldn’t be invisible if he tried. Although he wouldn’t officially be diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome until his freshman year of high school, Josh was six years old and onstage in a school Thanksgiving play when he first began exhibiting symptoms. By the time he was twenty, the young Mormon had reached his towering adult height of 6’7″ when — while serving on a mission for the Church of Latter Day Saints — his Tourette’s tics escalated to nightmarish levels.

Determined to conquer his affliction, Josh underwent everything from quack remedies to lethargy-inducing drug regimes to Botox injections that paralyzed his vocal cords and left him voiceless for three years. Undeterred, Josh persevered to marry and earn a degree in Library Science. At last, an eccentric, autistic strongman — and former Air Force Tech Sergeant and guard at an Iraqi prison — taught Josh how to “throttle” his tics into submission through strength-training.

Today, Josh is a librarian in the main branch of Salt Lake City’s public library and founder of a popular blog about books and weight lifting—and the proud father of four-year-old Max, who has already started to show his own symptoms of Tourette’s.

2) Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley: Lucy is in love with Shadow, a mysterious graffiti artist. Ed thought he was in love with Lucy, until she broke his nose. Dylan loves Daisy, but throwing eggs at her probably wasn’t the best way to show it. Jazz and Leo are slowly encircling each other. An intense and exhilarating 24 hours in the lives of four teenagers on the verge: of adulthood, of HSC, of finding out just who they are, and who they want to be.

3) Dreamwalkers (Dreamwalkers #1) by Corinne Davis: Emma Owens is a seemingly ordinary seventeen-year-old girl who covertly possesses the power to do anything she desires, without limitation, in a world filled with both infinite beauty and interminable danger, that exists only while she sleeps. Emma is a dreamwalker.

She inherited the dreamwalking trait from her father and inexplicably shares it with her best friend, Zoë. There are rules to dreamwalking that Emma and Zoë live their lives by. The most important of which is not to interact with unknown people who can see them while they dreamwalk, or risk becoming lost in a world of unrelenting darkness. Emma and Zoë have always followed the rules without question, but their conformity is tested when Emma learns that she is the only one capable of rescuing a young girl who has become profoundly lost on a dreamwalk.

When Emma launches a crusade to travel deep into the world of dreamwalking, gambling her own life to save the girl, Zoë agrees to stand by her side, unknowingly opening the door to her own astounding hidden faculties and uncovering a three hundred year old family secret in the process. Emma’s world is turned even further upside down when Charlie, the boy who shattered her heart into a thousand pieces, mysteriously returns with information that sends her head… and heart, spinning.

4) The Spectacular Now by Tim Tharp: Sutter Keely. He’S the guy you want at your party. He’ll get everyone dancing. He’ ll get everyone in your parents’ pool. Okay, so he’s not exactly a shining academic star. He has no plans for college and will probably end up folding men’s shirts for a living. But there are plenty of ladies in town, and with the help of Dean Martin and Seagram’s V.O., life’s pretty fabuloso, actually.

Until the morning he wakes up on a random front lawn, and he meets Aimee. Aimee’s clueless. Aimee is a social disaster. Aimee needs help, and it’s up to the Sutterman to show Aimee a splendiferous time and then let her go forth and prosper. But Aimee’s not like other girls, and before long he’s in way over his head. For the first time in his life, he has the power to make a difference in someone else’s life—or ruin it forever.

5) The Time of My Life by Cecelia Ahern: Lucy Silchester has an appointment with her life – and she’s going to have to keep it.

Lying on Lucy Silchester’s carpet one day when she returns from work is a gold envelope. Inside is an invitation – to a meeting with Life. Her life. It turns out she’s been ignoring itand it needs to meet with her face to face. It sounds peculiar, but Lucy’s read about this in a magazine. Anyway, she can’t make the date: she’s much too busy despising her job, skipping out on her friends and avoiding her family.

But Lucy’s life isn’t what it seems. Some of the choices she’s made – and stories she’s told – aren’t what they seem either. From the moment she meets the man who introduces himself as her life, her stubborn half-truths are going to be revealed in all their glory – unless Lucy learns to tell the truth about what really matters to her.

I also came across this great list of upcoming YA novels due to be published in early 2015 which is worth checking out.

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

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Friday Finds – 11 December 2014 (11)

Image1Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

I’m having another one of those weeks where time seems to evaporate like rain drops on lava, so this post will be shorter than normal. I haven’t made as many finds this week as I’ve been too busy with my head stuck in the ones I already found (my review for Falling into Place will be up asap and I already posted the one for Things Grak Hates) but I really like the sound of the ones I did find. I usually try and put my own spin on the synopsis for each one and tell you why I want to read it, but unfortunately I don’t have time tonight, so I’ll just share the ones from Goodreads, which sound pretty awesome anyway.

* I just realised that I posted this yesterday because I actually thought it was Friday not Thursday. I really am having a crazy week! Oh well, you got my finds a day early! 🙂

1) Brown Skin Blue by Belinda Jeffrey:

My mum’s skin is white, my skin is brown and I have a blue birthmark.

Two secrets rule my life. One is something I need to know and the other is something I need to forget. They won’t let me go.

Some people say you can’t death roll with a beast that has already survived a million years and live to tell the story.

Or can you?

2) The Earth Hums in B Flat by Mari Strachan:

Every night, 12-year-old Gwenni Morgan flies in her sleep. She leaves the bed she shares with her sister and soars into the night sky, listening to the nighttime sounds of her small Welsh village below. Irrepressible Gwenni — a dreamer full of unanswerable questions and unbounded curiosity — is childlike yet touchingly adult. Reluctantly facing a modern world, she prefers her nightly flights to school and her chores. Blessed with the uncommon insight of a young girl, Gwenni’s view of the world is unparalleled.

Quaint, odd, touched, funny in the head: Gwenni is all too familiar with the taunts of her peers and fields them with equanimity beyond her years. She knows she can no more change her nature than stop the sun from rising. And when a neighbour goes missing, Gwenni turns amateur sleuth, determined to solve the mystery of his disappearance. Little does she realize that the trail she’s pursuing will bring her uncomfortably close to home, and a dark secret.

3) Love is the Higher Law by David Levithan:

First there is a Before, and then there is an After. . . .

The lives of three teens—Claire, Jasper, and Peter—are altered forever on September 11, 2001. Claire, a high school junior, has to get to her younger brother in his classroom. Jasper, a college sophomore from Brooklyn, wakes to his parents’ frantic calls from Korea, wondering if he’s okay. Peter, a classmate of Claire’s, has to make his way back to school as everything happens around him.

Here are three teens whose intertwining lives are reshaped by this catastrophic event. As each gets to know the other, their moments become wound around each other’s in a way that leads to new understandings, new friendships, and new levels of awareness for the world around them and the people close by.

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

Friday Finds (10) – 5 December 2014

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Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

I missed Friday Finds last week as I was ill, so I’m going to share those finds this week. I love participating in this meme and it’s helped me find some great books and interesting blogs to follow. I was able to buy a couple of my previous finds in my pre-Christmas book haul earlier this week and I can’t wait to get stuck into them.

1) The Realm of Possibility by David Levithan: I’m aware that David Levithan is very popular in the YA world but I haven’t read much of him before except for Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares which he co-wrote with Rachel Cohn. That book was pretty good, but this one sounds even better. The synopsis starts with six words that really drew me in: One school. Twenty voices. Endless possibilities. It sounds like a really interesting exploration of the issues facing teenagers in the 21st century through the lives of twenty dynamic and compelling characters. My only concern is that twenty narrators are a lot for one novel, so I’m not sure how well that will work out. I guess I’ll have to read it to find out!

2) The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin: George Orr has the power to conjure things into reality through his dreams, which isn’t always a good thing. Desperately seeking help he turns to a psychotherapist who he hopes can assist him in controlling this ability. Unfortunately, this man has only dark intentions and may lead George into his biggest nightmare. As I’ve said in previous posts, I’m always interested to read stories centred around dreams because ever since I was a child I have always been able to remember my own in vivid detail. I don’t think I’d want many of them to become reality though!

3) Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin: After falling and hitting her head, Naomi wakes up with amnesia. Unable to remember anything about her former life she has to re-discover everything she used to know, and in the process comes to realise that some things are better the second time around – especially when you make different choices. I really like the concept for this one. What would you do if the slate was wiped clean and you had to start your life over again? If who we are is the sum of our experiences, then who do we become when those experiences are forgotten? I’m really interested to see how Naomi deals with these questions.

4) Deadline by Chris Crutcher: Ben Wolf is a 17-year-old high school student stuck living in the “nowheresville” town of Trout in Idaho. He wants to make his mark on the world, but there’s a problem – he only has one year to live. Deciding to keep this news to himself, Ben sets out to become the best football player in Trout high school’s history; annoy his ignorant civics teacher every day; and try to help the town drunk get sober. A secret like Ben’s can be a burden, though, especially when he realises he’s not the only one in Trout with secrets. I’m looking forward to finding out what Ben manages to achieve with the time he has left and what other secrets are lurking in Trout!

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

Pre-Christmas Book Haul

So I went Christmas shopping today (for other people, mind you) and then this happened …

Book Stack 2

I knew it was dangerous to walk into a bookshop when I really only have enough money at the moment to buy gifts for others, but is it my fault that some of those gifts can only be found in a bookshop? I admit it’s suspiciously convenient, but it wasn’t a deliberate excuse to wander around one of my favourite bookshops. Honest. Anyway, after picking up the presents I was looking for, I decided to treat myself to a book … and then another, and another, then I put one back (Eleanor & Park, I regret that now), then, oops, two more jumped into my hand! Others were calling to me with their bookish siren song, but I somehow managed to tear myself away and avoid being wrecked on the financial shoals. For now!

Here’s what I bought:

Falling into Place by Amy Zhang: I had almost made it to the counter to pay when I spotted this one on the corner of a table (like it was waiting for me). It was featured in my second Friday Finds post so I already knew I wanted to read it without having to check out the synopsis, hence the snap decision to buy it. Yay!

Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman: Many of you will have heard of the hugely popular and successful Netflix show which is based on Kerman’s account of the 15 months she served in prison. I absolutely LOVE the show and I’ve wanted to read the book for ages, so I’m really excited to have it. I had planned to wait until I could get the original cover rather than the Netflix one, but it was sitting right there on a shelf and I couldn’t help myself. Plus, my favourite actress ever is on the cover as she plays Galina “Red” Reznikov on the show (Kate Mulgrew, who I have raved about before on this blog), so I’m okay with this version. I can’t wait to read about the real story behind this awesome show.

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan: This one was featured in my third Friday Finds post and has been near the top of my TBR list since then. It was the book I picked up first and was supposed to be the only one I bought for myself today. Oh well! I’m super excited to finally have this one in my collection and it will probably be the one I read next after I finish the two I’m reading now (The Book Thief and my ARC copy of Things Grak Hates).

The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen: I’ve seen this on Goodreads several times over the past few months but I only recently added it to my TBR list. The synopsis sounds very odd, but in an interesting way, so I definitely want to read it. The cover is beautiful and the UK version has snow on it, so it’s perfect for this time of year. It makes me want to grab a hot chocolate and curl up with it on the couch. Ahh, bliss!

I’ll be reviewing all these once I read them, so stay tuned!

Friday Finds (9) – 21 November 2014

Image1Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

I’ve had a very busy week and I’m heading out to a family dinner tonight, so I’m afraid I’ve run out of time to write my usual length Friday Finds post. Today has completely gotten away from me! I’ll be back on form next week though.

1) The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton: My local indie bookseller said this was one of the best books she had read this year, which is good enough for me! I feel like this might remind me of watching The Borrowers when I was younger.

2) The Everything by Richard C. Cox: This book sounds crazy and really interesting. I love novels that turn the usual concepts of genre, style and layout on their heads, so I’m looking forward to this one.

3) Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz: I had seen this one popping up around Goodreads for a while before I finally put it on my TBR list. It’s another coming of age novel, but instead of the usual male and female pairing we have two male leads, which is what drew me to it. I love YA but the male/female journey of self-discovery can get a little repetitive, so I’m looking forward to a change of pace with this one.

4) Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kirstin Cronn-Mills: I’m not sure how I feel about the title, but I’ve never read a novel which deals with the issues faced by those who identify as transgender before, so I’m curious to see how the author handles this subject, particularly since this is a YA novel. I hope it’s done well and sensitively.

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

Friday Finds (8) – 14 November 2014

Image1Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

My birthday was last month and I’ve been saving the money I received for a book haul. My local indie bookshop doesn’t have a huge selection and I managed to make it out of there with some money still in my possession, so I’ll definitely be heading up to Waterstones in Edinburgh for another haul soon. I find a lot of new books on Goodreads or Facebook, so it was really nice to find some new reads in an actual bookshop. I had a list of books I was looking for when I went in there, but since they didn’t have any of them I spent some time browsing and talking with the shop’s owner, who of course had some great recommendations for me! Here are the ones I decided on:

Book Stack

1) The Universe Versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence: I rarely leave a bookshop without picking up at least one YA novel, and this trip was no exception. “When, aged seventeen, Alex is stopped at Dover customs with 113 grams of marijuana, an urn full of ashes on the passenger seat, and an entire nation in uproar, he’s fairly sure he’s done the right thing.” I’m very interested to know how Alex ended up in this unusual situation, and find out more about life with his clairvoyant mother and his unlikely friendship with the irritable and antisocial Mr Peterson. My YA-loving friend has told me this one is really good, so I think I’ve done the right thing too!

2) The Road Headed West: A Cycling Adventure Through North America by Leon McCarron: I don’t often read non-fiction books so this was an unusual pick for me, but I’ve been missing my friends and adventures in the US a lot over the last year, so I was drawn to this one. It’s the account of Leon McCarron’s 6,000 mile journey across North America beginning in New York and ending up at the Mexican border. After realising the fear of being stuck behind a desk for the rest of his life was greater than the fear of taking on such a journey with nothing but a backpack and a bicycle, he took off alone and had what sounds like the adventure of a lifetime. I’m definitely not a cyclist but I have had some wonderful experiences travelling along the west coast of the US, and I think this book will remind me of those times. I’m particularly interested to find out about his stop in Seattle as it’s probably my favourite city in the world and I miss it all the time.

3) TheMole Original Cover Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾ by Sue Townsend: My Mum had mentioned enjoying this book when she was younger so when I saw it on the shelf I just had to have it. This is the first of a series of Adrian Mole novels and is written in the form of a diary which chronicles the trials of Adrian’s early adolescence. The few extracts I’ve read are hilarious, so I’m really looking forward to reading it. The one I bought is the 30th anniversary edition so it has lots of additional features like a reprinting of the original 1982 cover on the inside (pictured left) and more details about Adrian from the author’s original manuscripts.

4) The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai: Firstly, I love the cover of this novel. Not the car andThe Borrower Cover the road so much but the bookshelves and the fact that all the text and images are made up of printed words from a book. The top corners of the back and front are also deigned to look like they’re from an old and worn book. It caught my eye right away and after reading the synopsis I was definitely keen to read it. Lucy Hill is a young children’s librarian who finds a ten-year-old boy has set up camp in her library after running away from his mother and the anti-gay classes she forces him to attend. Driven to help the young Iain Drake whose passion for reading rivals her own, Lucy agrees to “escape” with him from Missouri to Vermont. Their road trip takes them on an adventure involving an unwelcome boyfriend, the shadowy Russian connections of Lucy’s father, moral dilemmas, self-discovery … and some ferrets. I’m intrigued!

I’m also really excited to have received my first ARC. It was an unexpected surprise when the author, Peter J. Story, sent me a message on Goodreads and asked me why I was interested in his debut novel Things Grak Hates, which I had added to my “to-read” list, and if I would like a free copy in exchange for an honest review. Of course I said yes! I know this isn’t unusual but I’m not on NetGalley or anything so I wasn’t expecting to get any ARCs, hence the excitement! I’m nine chapters in at the moment and I’m quite enjoying it … I think. It’s certainly giving me a lot to think about! I’ll post the review once it’s done. On a side note, isn’t his surname awesome? How could he not become an author with a name like that?!

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

Friday Finds (7) – 7 November 2014

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Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

I’ve had a busy day today (which included spending an hour in a bookshop, yay!) so I’m a little late posting this as it’s technically Saturday in Scotland now, but I reckon a lot of you in different time zones are still up!

This is the longest that I’ve ever stuck with a weekly meme, and I’m so glad that I have. Between my own discoveries and those of other Friday Finders I’m building my “to-read” list faster than I’ll ever be able to keep up with, but that’s a cross all we bibliophiles must bear! I’m also enjoying the challenge I set myself every week of rewriting the synopsis of each book into my own words as much as possible. I could just copy the synopsis from Goodreads, and I do include the occasional quote if it is particularly interesting, but one of the reasons I started blogging was because I wanted to practice my writing and publishing skills. If I ever get a marketing job in a publisher, the ability to write a good synopsis will serve me well. I’m sure I don’t always get it quite right, which is why I provide the Goodreads link too, but it’s a fun activity and makes me feel even more excited about the books I discover.

1) The Young Elites (The Young Elites #1) by Marie Lu: This was recommended to me by a book loving friend. She gave it a 9.5 in her review, which is a rare thing, so I’m optimistic about it. Also, it sounds pretty damn awesome. Having survived a deadly illness which killed most of those it infected, Adelina Amouteru finds herself with an altered appearance and strange powers. She is now one of the Young Elites, and there are those in society who see her and those like her as a threat. The Inquisition Axis is tasked with killing any Young Elites they can find, while a secret group of Young Elites known as the Dagger Society set out to find and protect those like them before they’re killed, like Adelina. But Adelina isn’t just any Young Elite; she has abilities no one has ever seen before, and a desire for vengeance which may be the biggest threat of all. Sounds good to me!

2) Beggar Magic by H.L. Burke: The Strains are musical magic which weave their ever-changing melodies through the world of Gelia City. The ability to use them is hereditary, but not all citizens are created equal. The city is divided between the Highmost, those who can access the full power of the Strains, and the Commons, those who have only limited use, known as beggar magic. When Common teen Leilani befriends Highmost born Zebody, both girls get a new understanding of each other’s worlds. As their friendship grows, they discover a dangerous threat to the Strains hiding within the manors of the Highmost; one which could silence the music forever. In order to save their beloved Strains, the girls must risk everything, including death, to stop those responsible. I love the idea of music as power. I think most people would argue that music does have power, like its ability to calm, inspire and move us, but I’m really looking forward to reading about a world where music is truly magical, and about who would dare to destroy it!

3) Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King: This title really intrigued me and reading the synopsis sealed the deal. Lucky Linderman has a difficult life. His grandfather died in the Vietnam War, leaving his father devastated. His mother refuses to acknowledge the problems within their family, preferring to pretend that everything is just fine. And every day Lucky has to deal with the constant bullying of Nader McMillan, which is getting dangerously out of control. At night, though, Lucky has a unique escape from all this. His vivid dreams take him to the jungles of Laos during the Vietnam War, where he can be the person he wants to be and succeed where his grandfather failed. But reality is never far away, and Lucky must face the fact that he can’t hide in his dreams forever. I’m always intrigued by stories which feature dreams as a key element. Ever since I was a young girl, I have been able to remember my dreams in vivid detail. Going to sleep every night is like entering another world where anything can happen and the laws of physics do not exist. I love it, especially those rare occasions when I realise I’m dreaming, or lucid dreaming as science calls it, and that I’m no longer bound by the limitations of reality. Flying is usually my favourite activity, but I do like a bit of telekinesis! I’m really looking forward to finding out what Lucky does with his dreams.

4) Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig: “I want life. I want to read it and write it and feel it and live it. I want, for as much of the time as possible in this blink-of-an-eye existence we have, to feel all that can be felt. I hate depression. I am scared of it. Terrified, in fact. But at the same time, it has made me who I am. And if – for me – it is the price of feeling life, it’s a price always worth paying.” Like a lot of people, I can definitely relate to this. There are parts of my past that I would never want to relive, and I have to keep fighting with my illness-affected body and anxiety-riddled mind every day not to go to back to the place I was in as a teenager, but at the same time I would never change the things I’ve gone through. I draw strength from how far I have come in the last 10 years and all I have accomplished, and from the knowledge of how far I know I will go as I pursue the goals I have set for myself. We are shaped as much by our bad experiences as we are by our good ones, and accepting that fact is an important part of life. Having read Haig’s The Humans, I know he is very skilled in writing about human emotions, so I’m sure he will do the subject matter of this novel justice.

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

Friday Finds (2) – 3 October 2014

Image1Is it Friday again already? What am I doing with my life?? (Ooo, don’t open that door!) Anyway, on with this week’s Friday Finds!

Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers.

My list is heavy on YA fiction this week, which I seem to be into a lot at the moment. This could have something to do with the fact I’m turning 27 this month and my teenage years feel like a distant and confusing dream I’ve half forgotten, half made up. Maybe I’m looking to relive some of those years through these stories, although I can’t say I’ve ever tried to drive a Mercedes into a tree in a suicidal experiment to test out Newton’s laws of motion (see number 4 below). Or maybe I just like YA right now, who cares? Good books are good books. I’m going to try and diversify my finds for next week though. All books are linked to their Goodreads pages so you can discover them too.

1) Anatomy of a Misfit by Andrea Portes: Firstly, I love the title, which is what initially attracted me to it. Described as Mean Girls meets The Perks of Being a Wallflower (both of which I loved), it’s the story of a girl who denies her inner freak in order to maintain her position in her high school’s hierarchy while fighting her attraction to the loner while the popular guy hounds her for a date. This one really blows my “reliving my teenage years” theory out of the water, as my inner freak would not be denied and lived very much on the outside, and neither the loner nor the popular guy ever asked me out, but it still sounds like a good read to me!

2) The Magician’s Elephant by Kate DiCamillo: “What if? Why not? Could it be?” When I first read the synopsis for this book, I felt like it had an air of The Night Circus about it, which I’m a bit obsessed with (okay, a LOT obsessed, you can read my review to find out why). A boy goes to a fortune teller to ask about his missing sister, and what he learns there sends him on an incredible journey filled with love, hope … and magic. The book also contains some lovely pencil illustrations, which I’m sure will add to the story. It’s on the Y side of YA, but I have a feeling it would make a lovely bedtime story for the children I hope to have one day, so it’s on my TBR list.

3) Top Ten Clues You’re Clueless by Liz Czukas: Another easy-read-light-hearted-Sunday-afternoon book that I think sounds fun and interesting. This one is about a girl called Chloe who, along with five co-workers (one of whom she has a crush on), has been accused of stealing over $10,000. They all have to work together to get out of this mess, and if the reviews I’ve read are to be believed, the exploits of this diverse group of characters will have me laughing all the way through. Sold!

4) Falling into Place by Amy Zhang: The first line of the synopsis reads: “On the day Liz Emerson tries to die, they had reviewed Newton’s laws of motion in physics class. Then, after school, she put them into practice by running her Mercedes off the road.” This caught my attention and made me want to find out more. The novel apparently has a surprising narrator and is told in a nonlinear narrative, which is something I usually really enjoy, so I’m looking forward to this one.

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!

 

Friday Finds (1) – 26 September 2014

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Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading which encourages you to share the books you have discovered over the past 7 days with your fellow bloggers. Whether you found them in a bookshop, online, in the library or just heard about them from a friend, Friday Finds is a great way to spread the love with other readers.

I thought this meme was a great idea when I came across it last week, so I thought I’d join in. Below are the books I found this week. I’ve linked them to their Goodreads pages so you can all check them out too!

1) Geekhood: Mission Impossible by Andy Robb: This is the sequel to Geekhood: Close Encounters of the Girl Kind which I really enjoyed and will be reviewing here soon. I’m looking forward to reading more geeky adventures!

2) I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson: “A brilliant, luminous story of first love, family, loss, and betrayal for fans of John Green, David Levithan, and Rainbow Rowell.” Sold! Even without reading the synopsis (which sounds really good), I love those three authors so I definitely want to check out this one.

3) The Vault of Dreamers by Caragh M. O’Brien: As a person who always remembers her dreams and loves to enter another world when she sleeps, I’m really interested to read this book which is a psychological thriller about what happens when someone else controls your dreams.

4) Partials (The Partial Sequence #1) by Dan Wells: “The only hope for humanity isn’t human.” Sounds pretty cool to me! It’s recommended for fans of The Hunger Games, which I loved, and the plot sounds really exciting and interesting.

I’m also seriously excited to have found out that James Clemens, my favourite fantasy author, has planned out a new series set in the world of Alasea where his series The Banned and the Banished is set. Woohoo! I’ve written about how much I love that series a few times before on this blog, and I’m super excited that I’ll get to read about new adventures from Alasea. He’s also confirmed that there will be three more books from The Godslayer Chronicles, a series I moaned about having to wait for in a previous post, so that’s really awesome too!

(Thank you again, Markgil for telling me about this and giving me a link to the Goodreads Q&A. It was a really interesting read!)

So what books have you discovered this week? Have you read any of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments!